The morning medley: Trump fears scapegoating over family separation policy

National Nurses Week is in full swing and ABC’s “The View” has a guest of the day in Virginia’s McShin Foundation . The Campaign Life Project tells us that “President Trump is taking our…

The morning medley: Trump fears scapegoating over family separation policy

National Nurses Week is in full swing and ABC’s “The View” has a guest of the day in Virginia’s McShin Foundation . The Campaign Life Project tells us that “President Trump is taking our hospitals to a place he called ‘a hellhole.’” Amid all the wars on healthcare and the opioid crisis, how can the average American get through?

And as the Catholic bishops return from their weeklong meeting in Rome, Adam Bonin writes in The Tablet about their reaction to the child separation policy. Their response — and the relative lack of Americans who knew anything about it before this week — raises another point: Americans are still not as caring about immigration as they are about religious liberty and the rights of LGBTQ people.

The titular leader of Immigration and Customs Enforcement says that he fears he will be the scapegoat for the government’s policies that have resulted in children being separated from their families. “I made a promise as a candidate,” said Secretary Thomas Homan, who also faces a Senate confirmation hearing for the position, according to The Washington Post. “I’m a firm believer in the rule of law. That means if we get somewhere, the media gets to see it and so do you, so it’s okay. If you don’t like what’s happening, stand up and be a leader.”

President Trump plans to shut down the government again, this time as a result of an ongoing feud with Congress over his proposed border wall and his policy of separating children from their parents who are attempting to enter the United States illegally. Last week, Trump invoked emergency powers to receive $5.7 billion for the project, a move that lawmakers staunchly opposed and which raises the question of whether the government will have the money it needs to continue to execute the separation policy.

In other news from the Trump administration, both federal agencies and parts of Congress have pursued different policies toward transgender people. Yesterday, the Department of Justice told a federal court in Texas that it won’t allow children with transgender parents to seek asylum if they seek entry into the U.S. Meanwhile, over in the GOP-led Congress, House Republican leaders say that they don’t plan to bring up transgender rights legislation anytime soon.

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is retiring. On the business front, the House of Representatives is embarking on a two-week recess. Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to refocus the effort on repealing Obamacare later this year.

These are the five most important health stories you need to know today.

In West Virginia, officials are citing high levels of toxic chemicals in water and wondering what happens to the kids.

The female health care provider, Nurse Jackie, knows how urgent the opioid crisis is, but she also knows how it’s affecting the rest of the country. Read our interview with her.

Immigrants in the United States are fighting to stay in the country. Today, they’re heading to court to challenge the Trump administration’s actions at the border, the AP reports.

The Trump administration is launching a crackdown on homeschoolers. Read the story.

Philadelphia School District Superintendent William Hite has a tough job. Read the story.

E-cigarettes are now the main cause of early tobacco smoking deaths, according to an increasingly popular new study. The Wall Street Journal reports.

This Sunday, we’ll continue our weeklong series on the mystery of the Yanny or Laurel debate. (Spoiler alert: It’s Laurel.)

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