Speed limit is cut for Japan’s Jomon Railroad

Matt Parkes / EPA / Retuers On 4 January, the International Maritime Organization agreed to reduce the speed limit on the Jomon to 0.415 knots. In advance of the decision there has been much…

Speed limit is cut for Japan's Jomon Railroad

Matt Parkes / EPA / Retuers

On 4 January, the International Maritime Organization agreed to reduce the speed limit on the Jomon to 0.415 knots. In advance of the decision there has been much debate around the possible travel impact on Japanese nationals of this on upping the number of trains on the track.

Click on the sound bite box below to hear and discuss the debate on the issue.

When could trains get faster?

In a press conference, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism & Cojo Kawamura said that the decision to cut the speed limit was done so to accommodate world-class international competition and not be done with any particular controversy.

The speed-limiting period for the Jomon will be one day, which can be determined through a means of formal opinion.

Not everyone is happy with the decision to change the speed limit. Some argue that cutting the speed limit will cause problems for local commuters and for elderly people travelling home. The elderly population are worried that the roads will be too crowded. Some officials are worried that train equipment will be damaged. Another popular sentiment is that the move will make new international ports in Japan less attractive.

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