Pro-Trump Democrat Strategist Phil Singer and FOX Business Analyst Jim Pinkerton On President Trump’s Man of the Arts

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip. Welcome to our new weekly TV Club, a 12-week series in which we’ll speak with various individuals to get your take on the week in TV. Last…

Pro-Trump Democrat Strategist Phil Singer and FOX Business Analyst Jim Pinkerton On President Trump's Man of the Arts

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip.

Welcome to our new weekly TV Club, a 12-week series in which we’ll speak with various individuals to get your take on the week in TV. Last week, The Post’s Tom Shales and Mediaite’s Alex Weprin talked about the Summer of Love, the state of late night, and the endless awards season. This week, we’ve got Democratic strategist Phil Singer and FOX Business analyst Jim Pinkerton.

We’ll start with Phil on President Trump’s affection for the arts and artsy things in the White House. He explains that it stems from the president’s business background:

(Singer) “The guy who bought and sold Broadway was Mr. Trump. He once told me that he never wanted to run a real estate business, ‘I wanted to be a Broadway producer.’ That’s the man who loves all things creative and that sort of lifts his spirits and lifts his mood. If anything in the White House can get Trump going, it is the paintings by Warhol, the photographs by Cindy Sherman, the videos by Damien Hirst – it’s rich, it’s visual, it’s aesthetic – and to be able to really love this country and be surrounded by all of this is a very healing thing.”

Next, James Pinkerton weighs in on the fate of late night comedy. He explains the transition from the golden age of Johnny Carson to the golden age of Jimmy Fallon and says the last quarter-century has seen a precipitous decline in quality:

(Pinkerton) “With the great exception of NBC’s Jimmy Fallon and CBS’s Stephen Colbert who, in addition to starting to pay more attention to political analysis and a higher level of journalism, are doing much better at the debate. You don’t see that much anymore with CBS or ABC or even NBC – or even on MSNBC, for that matter. People get really turned off by these tedious talking heads debating arcane issues about how television ought to be structured, and how people ought to engage, and what should be in the press. People are now tuning out, they’re tuning out not just in morning talk shows but late night. They’re tuning out the press like nobody’s business and they’re being weaned off. And then you get to a point where you’ve got a world where Stephen Colbert had the highest audience and the highest rating of anyone except for Fox News and again, that tells you all you need to know.”

Listen to the entire show here and tune in next week to find out what Pinkerton has to say about the future of Fox Business.

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