‘He Started This Movement’: Death of Memphis Rapper Young Dolph Rocked Community

Disturbing details are emerging about the death of a promising Memphis rapper, who was shot and killed early Friday morning. According to WREG, Young Dolph, 36, was shot and killed while driving on the…

'He Started This Movement': Death of Memphis Rapper Young Dolph Rocked Community

Disturbing details are emerging about the death of a promising Memphis rapper, who was shot and killed early Friday morning.

According to WREG, Young Dolph, 36, was shot and killed while driving on the Southside of Memphis at 4:30 a.m.

Witnesses told the station that Young Dolph, whose real name is LaRon James, was on his way to his car and exchanging words with another driver when someone opened fire.

“I was driving with him. And I heard like ten to fifteen pops. And then he just took off and laid down on the side of the street,” a witness told WREG.

Young Dolph is the founder of World Star Hip Hop and he was shot earlier this year at a concert when his bike was stolen. He was also the target of a failed assassination attempt in 2013.

His death marks a painful end to his long battle with drug addiction, which became known as the “Young Guns” movement.

“To know his life and struggle, especially the struggle that he had to endure, as a young man that had a positive spirit and was on the road to success, is something that I feel so deeply about and so many people in the area, as a member of the community, we feel about him,” Mack Maine, the president of Travi$ Scott’s label, told the station.

“He was a very powerful person that brought a whole lot of attention to this city, a lot of money for the state, and I really think it’s just an unfortunate event,” he said.

South Memphis Councilman Harold Collins expressed his grief on Facebook, writing: “This city grieves for the loss of our young prince who served the city with a sword. His death reminds us that we lost a brother. More importantly, we all lost a friend.”

Cora McDaniel, a life coach and a coach on WREG’s “Confidence Game,” said Young Dolph had a “spirit of unapologetic hustle and fury,” and he had the rare ability to identify and catch opportunity before most people.

“He opened many doors for himself, his managers, his label, the opportunity to be in such a stratosphere and make so much more than he would’ve made just on his own. And he worked hard for everything he had, but he was truly driven by greatness and he knew what was expected of him,” McDaniel said.

Don’t miss “Roseanne,” a riveting and revealing look at our own white working class through the personal stories of three mothers trying to raise their families in a period of profound change.

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