From coins to ice cream, these things every brand has to trademark

When we spotted a stunt for Michael Jordan’s ice cream, it wasn’t the first time we’d seen the origin of a cryptocurrency company’s name. — [email protected] (@Lckhouse) July 5, 2016 Probably not what you…

From coins to ice cream, these things every brand has to trademark

When we spotted a stunt for Michael Jordan’s ice cream, it wasn’t the first time we’d seen the origin of a cryptocurrency company’s name. — [email protected] (@Lckhouse) July 5, 2016

Probably not what you want to see when you’re walking by a stall selling chocolates. — Microstrategy (@Microstrategy) May 18, 2017

i admit, @mr_jaebas’ chocolates look tempting. how about a bite of a $70 mrk is without context? pic.twitter.com/XRYZEha1Ez — Baratunde (@baratunde) March 21, 2017

crashed your home improvement store, but he didn’t topple all the furniture. pic.twitter.com/Wsxy5Udu1I — cfj (@cfj1986) March 28, 2017

We’re not sure what the value of a foam finger is but it can’t buy you a meal as quickly as a CoPilot virtual currency (which seems to be highly appreciating).

You’ll be pleased to know that cryptocurrency may not be used in this argument, but you’ll also want to see if the guy is worth a fuck and if that’s the case, you’ll want to ask how he’s going to pay for your dinner.

More than just a slick chocolate wrapper

It’s all fun and games, until someone likes you back. And so that person’s precious facial expression gets supplanted by the need to be courted.

That’s why designers decided to name their products as well. ShreddDuty.com was a joke, but instead of shrugging off the whimsical design and simply selling it, it asked people to buy it and make the joke real.

CoPilot, on the other hand, had very real business reasons to play with the approach: In 2012 it published its business plan to the public, flirting with selling US$70 mrk coins. And for a while it seemed like the plan was working, until Donald Trump got elected president of the United States.

Luckily, people were watching. Someone started Tweeting at CoPilot to buy them out, as these things generally do. Because this happened, CoPilot made the design public, and the next thing you know, the only way to buy CoPilot was to buy the name with it. Now CoPilot itself has a name and it doesn’t have to sell mrk.

Whether anyone actually listens to jokes with tricky names is another matter. Upworthy’s most famous joke is, in truth, pretty funny. If your web domain is funny, you do really well. These days, people pay as much as $20,000 to be in front of a Rocket League crowd. And what about Pizza Day? PizzaDay.com makes sense, except the tweets are too awful to stand up on their own.

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