Despite Bullying, Hockey Player Finds Meaning in Team’s Help

The close contact and slalom defensive skills developed while participating in the mixed martial arts game AERamore must now be applied to two tasks. The first: recovery from his condition. “After my accident I…

Despite Bullying, Hockey Player Finds Meaning in Team’s Help

The close contact and slalom defensive skills developed while participating in the mixed martial arts game AERamore must now be applied to two tasks. The first: recovery from his condition. “After my accident I was a very angry kid,” he said. “I didn’t want to play hockey again or even look at a goal in my head because I thought it was going to kill me. My hands weren’t stable so I had to use a stick like a butter knife to give myself back control.” The second task: the hockey team that helped Adam return to the ice last year. After talking with the players about his condition, Adam became an honorary member of the team last November. “They tried to encourage me,” he said. “They understood that when I watch the game I could see myself playing on the team.”

The work of Dr. Thomas Dewsnup, a Pittsburgh physician specializing in sports medicine, is unique in its application. In 2008, he invented a head protection helmet that stops the brain from hitting the air from a forward push. Using cutting-edge software, Dr. Dewsnup designed a concussion simulator that can reproduce a score of actual concussions, allowing participants to decide when they can return to the ice.

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