Chicago police chief calls on FOP to back candidate in mayoral race against Rahm Emanuel

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson found himself at odds with the police union on Wednesday, a week after union President Dean Angelo Sr. said he was thinking about running for mayor against Rahm Emanuel….

Chicago police chief calls on FOP to back candidate in mayoral race against Rahm Emanuel

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson found himself at odds with the police union on Wednesday, a week after union President Dean Angelo Sr. said he was thinking about running for mayor against Rahm Emanuel.

Days after Angelo announced his plans to run, Emanuel acknowledged that he had been approached by people about a run, but reiterated he has no interest in running.

“Everyone knows I’m not running for mayor,” Emanuel said during a city budget address Wednesday at a West Loop community center. “If you ask the hundreds of people that are in the process of collecting the petitions to run for mayor, they will tell you I have no intention to run.”

The Chicago Fraternal Order of Police pulled out of a public safety agreement with the mayor’s office on Thursday after being unsatisfied with discussions. Ald. Leslie Hairston, 5th, is working to pass a resolution in support of that agreement. She is also expected to introduce the resolution in support of a police chief, but she could not provide any time frame for when she will vote on it.

Hairston told WGN-TV last week she didn’t have a problem with Angelo running against Emanuel. “There are very good people running [for] different office. At the end of the day, when we are the individuals representing law enforcement, we need to all sit down and have talks,” she said.

But Lightfoot brushed off the notion.

“For so many people, the union leadership comes first, and they want to continue that relationship with the union leaders first, before they begin to listen to the rank and file,” Lightfoot said in an interview with WBEZ on Wednesday. “They have been extremely dismissive of the rank and file in the way that they represent them, and has led to a lot of anxiety, particularly among the women and the people in the African-American community.”

Lightfoot served on the Fraternal Order of Police executive board for many years as a Cook County Commissioner and deputy state’s attorney before being elected Chicago’s top prosecutor in 2010.

“I served on the union board for years, and many people served on the union board for years, and that relationship doesn’t work for a city government and Chicago Police Department,” Lightfoot said. “The community and the people we serve in our city deserve better than that.”

Angelo said he’s received encouragement from top Democrats who want him to run for mayor and is “considering the factors of how it would work.”

“Well, Emanuel never responded, at the very least, to my email, so I’ll answer you with, that’s rather passive aggressive,” Angelo said in an interview Thursday on WGDJ-AM. “Away from the cameras, he’s the mayor. That’s his job, and he’s going to do what he’s got to do.”

“To me, it would be a gift,” Angelo added. “That would mean I wouldn’t have to worry about campaigning, and I wouldn’t have to worry about destroying the union, and all of a sudden, I would get to say, ‘Yeah, I’m Mayor. And yeah, I’m Rahm Emanuel.’ I get to have that moment. There’s nothing wrong with that.”

Angelo said he would be a pro-cop candidate who doesn’t support anti-cop and anti-immigrant rhetoric in the streets.

“I have to acknowledge they have been corrupt at times, but I’d be fair,” Angelo said. “This city needs someone to be transparent about their personality, and the mayor will never do that, so people need to get a better sense of why this mayor is the way he is.”

Leave a Comment