Canadians’ online census participation at record levels as 82% take the census

Participation at 72% — a 0.7% increase on the previous year Canadians have taken the most part of the mandatory national census online for the first time in almost 30 years, Statscan said Thursday….

Canadians' online census participation at record levels as 82% take the census

Participation at 72% — a 0.7% increase on the previous year

Canadians have taken the most part of the mandatory national census online for the first time in almost 30 years, Statscan said Thursday.

The following are highlights from Statscan’s report on the 8.4m head counts the government agency has received through the online Survey of Income, Housing and Living Conditions (SoHo) since its start in January.

The Census of Income, Housing and Living Conditions (SoHo) has remained the most popular online survey for over 20 years. It contains a questionnaire about data collected about personal circumstances and incomes.

For the first time, the SoHo was completed online by 53% of the head counts completed this year. The overall participation rate was 72%, an increase of 0.7 percentage points over 2017. The rate has been above 70% for most years since 2010.

The paper survey for the 2018 census, delivered over the postal service, was completed by 27% of all head counts. That is an increase of 10 percentage points over 2017, representing more than one in five head counts. The overall participation rate was about 27%.

The median number of evenings in residence, for single respondents and non-parents, was 90 (89% of single respondents had an apartment and the same percentage had a home), up 2 percentage points since 2017. Married respondents and parents occupied slightly fewer than half of all nights, on average.

The proportion of single children living with a single parent dropped by 0.6 percentage points since 2017 to 20.4% (14.4% of all single parents were children of divorced parents or widowed parents, respectively, but only about 10% of the same population was living in a married household).

The top occupation of unmarried parents was working — 31.1%, up from 29.7% in 2017 — followed by primary caregiver (26.4%).

The share of unmarried parents with children living at home increased by 0.2 percentage points from 2017 to 23.4% (9.4% of all single parents had children living at home).

The top 10 occupations of single children living with a single parent included primary caregiver, followed by teacher (7.8%), artist (6.6%), nurse (5.3%), doctor (4.8%), mechanic (4.7%), journalist (4.4%), teacher (4.2%), accountant (4.2%), accountant (4.1%), and nurse (3.7%).

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