7 things to talk about with your boss before heading back to work

By Liz Wardlaw PR After a longer break than most of us would like to admit, the question of going back to work seems to sneak up on all of us. But before all…

7 things to talk about with your boss before heading back to work

By Liz Wardlaw

PR

After a longer break than most of us would like to admit, the question of going back to work seems to sneak up on all of us. But before all our doubts can be questioned, consider these questions that your manager might ask before they give you the go-ahead to go back to the office.

RELATED: What HR Really Thinks About Working With Their Boss

How Are You Feeling?

Yes, we know that your boss isn’t feeling a keen sense of optimism at the moment. Unless you’re running for election or you’re keeping a personal journal in which you write each day’s concerns, you have to assume that they’ve been through a lot recently. But at the end of the day, you also know that your boss’s feelings are secondary to your happiness as a workaholic. Until you’ve thought about your current state and asked what they think about your state of mind, maybe it’s not too late to salvage your enthusiasm.

Still Feeling Burned Out?

You’re probably exhausted already. And while you’re leaving your sleeping partner at home for a little Christmas joy, there are an awful lot of work days where you won’t get a good night’s sleep. What will a mere office struggle look like for you? If you really are going to try your very best to claw yourself back to health and productivity, an argument to make at the very least is that you are actually doing more with your free time and “quality” time than many you work with do. So stop complaining about how people don’t realize you’re like a son to them, and start working with what you have.

Are You Ready to Try Again?

Everyone wants to come back to work full of energy and ready to get the job done. But you have to work hard at being present for your colleagues, not be defensive or remember every word that was said. Your employer just wants to know that you’re ready to return to work, not that you deserve a new job. On the one hand, they want you to be the best version of yourself, while at the same time, they want you to be your focus. You may feel like leaving, but if you handle the situation well, your boss will be the one that gets the opportunity to turn the tables and start appreciating how much he knows about your successes and failures, and how loyal and committed you are.

Are You Learning From Your Mistakes?

If you really are willing to put in the hard work necessary to improve yourself, then it’s time to offer some introspection about what you learned and where you failed. If you’re feeling like you took some things for granted or failed to account for the ways that you don’t always do things the right way, your employer will be glad to hear you say those things and reach out to you with some real-world suggestions on how to make things better.

Does Everything Have to Be in Writing?

Does your manager ever want to go over some of your notes in writing before you get the okay to go back to work? Ask for it. And if you remember a mistake or a decision you’d like to take back? Include that information, too. That and an idea of what you want to change in your contract to make sure your boss has nothing to worry about when you do finally return. It’s a lot easier to start from scratch than get involved in a six-month project from scratch when you’re on your first attempt.

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